April 23, 2014
 

Who Can Vote

On election day, you can vote if you...
  • Are 18 years of age or older,
  • Are a Canadian citizen,
  • Reside in an electoral district, and
  • Have not already voted

If you meet these requirements, you are an eligible elector.

What happens if you…

Live temporarily outside the province

If you are temporarily living outside of Ontario, you can apply to vote by Special ballot and also apply to be named on the Register of Absentee Electors, subject to certain conditions.

If you are an elector temporarily living outside Ontario for a period of less than 2 years, you are eligible to vote by mail if you are 18 years of age or older on election day, a Canadian citizen, have not already voted in this election and

  • You stopped living in Ontario in the two years before election day
  • You lived in Ontario for a minimum of 12 consecutive months before leaving the province and
  • You plan to live in Ontario again

Note: Qualified electors in the following categories can vote regardless of the length of time they have been out of Ontario. These electors are:

  • On active duty as a member of the Canadian Forces
  • Working for the Government of Canada or Ontario
  • Attending an educational institution, or
  • A family member of anyone in the above list

Special ballot

If you live temporarily outside the province, you can apply to vote by Special ballot.

Live inside the province but are temporarily outside of your electoral district

If you are an eligible elector living somewhere in Ontario, away from your permanent residence, you can return home to vote at an advance poll or on election day, or vote in your returning office by Special ballot.

If you are unable to vote at an advance poll on election day or at your returning office, you can apply to vote by Special ballot.

Voting by Special ballot is a process that provides electors with an opportunity to cast their ballot either in-person at their local returning office or to vote by mail.

Special ballot

If you live inside the province but are temporarily outside of your electoral district, you can apply to vote by Special ballot using the vote by mail process.

Are in a correctional facility

As an incarcerated elector, you can apply to vote by Special ballot using the vote by mail process.

Voting by Special ballot is a process that provides electors with an opportunity to cast their ballot by mail.

Special ballot

If you are an in a federal or provincial correctional facility, you can apply to vote by Special ballot using the vote by mail process.

Live on or off campus as a post secondary student

During an election, you may find yourself living away from your family's home. You may wish to vote for a candidate in the electoral district where you live while attending college or university or you may want to vote for a candidate in the electoral district where you live while not attending school.

You are given the opportunity to decide which residence you consider to be your principal residence. This decision will determine your pool of candidates. Regardless of which residential address you choose, all voting options, including voting by Special ballot, are available to you.

If you are a student with a physical disability and cannot go to the returning office, advance poll or election day to vote, you may request a home visit.

Are temporarily in hospital

Electors who are temporarily hospitalized and unable to vote at advance polls, on election day, or at the returning office may vote by Special ballot. To accommodate these electors, Special Ballot Officers will go to designated hospitals to facilitate the completion of the Special Ballot Application and voting processes.

Temporarily hospitalized electors will be able to vote regardless of whether the hospital is inside or outside of the electors' electoral district at the time the election is held.

Are unable to leave your home

If you're unable to leave your home, you may be eligible to request a home visit. You can ask to vote at home by Special ballot if:

  • you're eligible to vote in the election

  • it is impossible or unreasonably difficult for you to get to your local returning office or satellite office, and

  • you need help completing the Special Ballot Application because of a disability or because you're unable to read or write.

To request a home visit, please contact your local returning office or satellite office.

Have no permanent residence

The place where you most frequently eat or sleep during the five weeks prior to election day is considered your residence. Check our ID page (318KB PDF) to see if you already have a piece of ID that meets our requirements.

If you don't have ID showing proof of your name and residence, Elections Ontario has created a temporary form of identification – the Certificate of Identity and Residence – to meet the requirements to receive a ballot. The Certificate of Identity and Residence shows either a shelter or food bank – a place where the elector returns to either eat or sleep in the 5 weeks preceding the election – as the prospective voter's residence. If you eat or sleep at a shelter or food bank, you can ask a staff member from that facility to help you fill out this form. You may also contact Elections Ontario for help.

Staff members of homeless shelters and food banks who would like to help their clients receive this temporary ID form are encouraged to contact Elections Ontario, or download the instructions and registration form (372KB PDF).

If you need any further assistance, please contact a member of the Elections Ontario Outreach Team at 1-888-246-3335 or email outreach@elections.on.ca.

Want to request a home visit?

To request a home visit, please contact your local returning office or satellite office.